SNAPPER

SNAPPER

Pagrus auratus


REGION
Southern WA, SA, VIC, TAS, NSW/ACT, Southern QLD
CATCH EASE
Hard
HABITAT
Bay, Offshore

As we are about Australian fishing, we are concerned with the Australasian Snapper, also known as the Silver Seabream. The Australian Snapper is found throughout the coastal waters of Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Indonesia, China, Taiwan and Japan, although the regions where it is found in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are not connected.

Snapper are also commonly called Schnapper, Pink Snapper, Red Bream, Cocknies, Pinkies, Squire, Squirefish, Cockney Bream and ‘Old Man Snapper’. References and names depend on the size of the fish.

Snapper are another fish that have been affected by overfishing.

HOW TO IDENTIFY SNAPPER

Snapper range from a striking pink to a copper colour with some fish having blue spots on the body. Snapper are distinguished by a rather obvious bump on the head above and just behind the eyeline. They can grown to around 35cm over 5 years.

WHERE TO CATCH SNAPPER

Snapper are common in the southern waters off Australia’s coast from Coral Bay in Western Australia around the southern coast as far north as Hervey Bay in southern Queensland, although the fish are most common in southern waters but have been caught off the very top end of northern Queensland.

Snapper spawn in inshore waters and live in rocky reefs as deep as 200m. Larger fish may even enter estuaries and harbours, for example, Port Phillip Bay has a famous seasonal Snapper run.

HOW TO CATCH SNAPPER

Snapper are normally taken on the bottom as the prefer the edges of reefs or bottom with rocks and other structure. Snapper can be taken from the shore right out as deep as 200m.

Snapper form schools, which make for excellent fishing. They are commonly taken on fresh baits. Snapper respond well to berley. Research has shown that Snapper tend to live their life in their habitat. Smaller fish released will be there to catch another day. Lures are increasingly popular with success.