Man Casting Into River

USING THE PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS TO GET A LONGER CAST

Casting is often referred to as an art form, a complete combination of body and rod coming together in unison to propel your rig as far as you can. But, I prefer to think of it a little differently. For me, casting is pure numbers.

Casting distance comes down to physics. Technique can only get you so far, but ultimately you want to improve your distance, you need to modify the physics of your casting.

USE THE THINNEST LINE POSSIBLE

Going thinner (lighter) without sacrificing strength should always be a priority when trying to improve your casting distance. The larger the line diameter, the more weight the lure has to carry, which eventually slows its momentum and brings it to an abrupt stop.

My line diameter is the single biggest factor affecting my casting distance. Thinner lines also reduce the friction on the guides. Less surface area means less contact with the guides. This is why I opt for braid line. Monofilament is just as strong, but usually comes with a larger diameter for the same breaking strain. Switch to braid with a smaller line diameter and you’ll get a longer cast.

USE A SPIN REEL WITH A LONG, FAST-ACTION ROD

Again, the physics of your equipment makes all the difference. Spinning reels allow the line to unravel freely, making them ideal for long casts. A longer rod increases the leverage of your cast and the fast-action properties will channel more power into your cast, propelling your lure even further.

TRANSFER YOUR WEIGHT FROM YOUR BACK LEG TO YOUR FONT LEG IN THE CAST

Trying to load up your cast in your arm and hurl your rig into the horizon is setting yourself up for sloppy technique and a cast that falls short of where you want it. Instead, keep your technique smooth and comfortable and concentrate on shifting your weight.

In the process of casting, you should see your weight shift from your back leg into your front leg, putting your whole body into the cast. If you are only using your arms, you are missing out on all the power that comes from incorporating your whole body into the movement. It will give you less power, and ultimately, less distance.

CHANGE YOUR LINE REGULARLY

Particularly in cheaper lines, it is imperative that you change your line regularly to give you the longest possible cast. When your line is coiled up on the spool for a long period of time, it develops memory, retaining the shape of the spool, and losing valuable casting inches.

THINK ABOUT THE LURE

A big spinnerbait is not as aerodynamic as a streamlined, light lure that won’t be taken with the slightest breeze. Go for streamlined, sleek lures for the maximum possible casting distance that will dart through the air like a bullet instead of sailing in the breeze.

Casting is pure physics. Control the variables and treat it like a science, and you’ll increase the distance. There is a time and place for treating casting like an art form, the fly application springs to mind where accuracy is everything, or fishing near structure where too much distance will see you tangled in a pier or sunken timber. But for offshore scenarios where casting length is a priority, it is all about the physics. Master the physics and you master the science of a long cast.


 

Is there anything you would like to add? Share your thoughts below.

...
Tags:
mm
Peter Hollingsworth
peterh@dinga.com.au

Peter has been fishing all around Australia since he was a boy. He loves camping, fishing and kayak fishing.