The Uni Knot 1

THE UNI KNOT TO RULE THEM ALL

One of the most frustrating steps on your fishing journey is learning how to tie strong, reliable knots. Dave Magner reckons you can make things a lot easier for yourself if you just learn to tie a Uni Knot.

COPING WITH THE MULTITUDE OF FISHING OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Fishing is a great sport because it can be as basic or as complicated as you want to make it. If your thing is to grab a rod and soak a bait off a quiet beach that’s fine. Maybe you prefer walking along a creek bank flicking lures or flies, that’s great too. Perhaps you own a game boat and want to chase Marlin way out in the ocean, sounds like a plan to me. I can’t think of many other sports which allow you to pursue them at your own level and in so many different ways as fishing does.

THE UNI KNOT IS THE KNOT FOR 99% OF SITUATIONS

Now, I know that there are a lot of different fishing styles and methods mentioned there, and a whole range of rods and tackle that might be used, so you’re probably thinking you’d need to master a whole range of complicated knots to be able to try them all. The truth is however; you don’t need to. You just need to know one simple knot and as long as you tie it properly, it will get you out of trouble in around 99% of situations.

THE UNI KNOT IS THE MOST VERSATILE AND SECURE

That knot is the Uni Knot and it’s probably the most versatile and secure knot you can learn. Unlike some knots, it doesn’t weaken your line a great deal and you can use it to tie on a hook, make a loop for attaching a lure, join leader to mainline, or even use it to make tapered leaders for fly fishing. Sure, it’s not perfect, and it does have its limitations in heavy tackle (which we’ll cover later) but it’s pretty damn good at most jobs. If fishing knots were tools, the Uni Knot would be the Swiss Army Knife.

Now, I’m not going to try and explain how to tie a Uni Knot here as that info can already be found just about everywhere online. There are also countless videos on Youtube which you can watch to see exactly how it’s done. My advice would be to sit down with your chosen video, a spool of line a pair of scissors and just practice, practice, practice until you can do it without watching any more.

UNI KNOT USES AND BENEFITS

The most common use I have for a Uni Knot is tying things onto the end of my leader. Now there are heaps of knots I could use for this task but the Uni Knot gets the nod simply because it won’t slip under pressure. Even if it did, because the line is tied with multiple wraps, it won’t come undone if the end does come loose. That makes it a lot more secure than most other knots and you can trim tag ends off nice and close to keep things neat.

If I want to tie a loop knot (for tying a hard-bodied lure on), I simply pull the knot up short and tighten the tag end rather than the main line. Doing this will lock the knot in place. Granted, it will pull tight under pressure from a hooked fish or snag but you should always check and retie your knot after that happens anyway.

Tying a leader or backing on is done with two Uni knots. Simply lay the lines alongside each other before you begin, and tie a unit knot in each end, so that the knots wrap around both lines. When you pull them up tight, one knot simply pulls up against the other. The result is a join that is not quite 100% strong, but more than workable in most situations.

THE PROBLEMS AND PITFALLS OF THE UNI KNOT

About the only problem I have found with Uni Knots is when it comes to heavy tackle. If your leader is too thick, the number of wraps involved makes the knot a little bulky, and it can be too large for some smaller runners. This can make casting difficult. In really heavy tackle things like the FG knot are more suitable, and the FG is one of the few knots I also use on a regular basis.

LEARN ONE KNOT AND TIE IT WELL

If you are new to fishing, one of the best bits of advice I can give you is learn how to tie a Uni knot. Learn to tie it by feel, so you can do it in the dark or when your eyes get old and tired like mine. It’s strong, effective and versatile and it’s one of the best knots you can hope to master on your journey to becoming a better angler.

 


So what do you have to think about what Dave Magner has to say? Is there anything that you can bring to the table, other than fishing and chips?

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Dave Magner
magner66@tpg.com.au

Dave is a keen and experienced lure and fly angler who has travelled and fished right across Australia and New Zealand. He particularly enjoys tournament bass fishing, chasing freshwater species from his kayak and bluewater pelagics from his boat.