THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SALTWATER AND FRESHWATER FLY FISHING ROD FEATURE

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SALTWATER AND FRESHWATER FLY FISHING RODS

The idea of fly fishing is to build momentum when casting a fly line. Through the help of fly rods, you’ll be able to control the distance and direction of your casting. Aside from that, a rod also assists in fighting and reeling in a fish. Modern fly rods have different sizes, lengths and designs. Because fly fishing can be done in both saltwater and freshwater, manufacturers have designed rods suitable for each type. But, what exactly is the difference between a saltwater and freshwater fly rod. Let’s take a look at some of the differences

SALTWATER FLY RODS

To differentiate the two rods, first, we must look at the targets these rods will encounter. Saltwater fish are generally stronger and have more stamina. Also, saltwater fish have more room to fight. If you’re fishing on the flats, a fish can run fast and long. But if you’re fishing in saltwater, the fish will run down until it reaches the bottom, and depths vary where you fish.

These are the factors the designers consider when making a rod. They design saltwater fly rods to be rigid, so it can handle the challenges you’ll be facing when fishing in deep waters. Saltwater fly rods are also designed to be capable of dead weight lifting. Also, because the rods will be drenched in saltwater every time, they are built to withstand corrosion. That is why saltwater fly rods are usually made of fibreglass or graphite.

Generally, fibreglass rods are stronger and tougher, while graphite rods are stiffer and more sensitive. Because of the rigid build, saltwater fly rods are usually heavier and thicker. Another additional design difference between the two types of rods is that saltwater fly rods can do muscle casts through strong wind using force.

FRESHWATER FLY RODS

As for the basic design and purpose of freshwater fly rods, they don’t differ that much with their counterpart. There are two main differences between the two. For one, freshwater fly rods aren’t built to be corrosion resistant, especially in the reel seat area of the rod. The other is that the freshwater fly rod doesn’t normally use a reel that has the line capacity of saltwater fly rod.


 

Is there anything that you can add to this article? Share your thoughts below.

...
mm
Jackson Williams
jacksonw@dinga.com.au

Jackson Williams has been fishing around Australia for 20 years and loves his home region of far north Queensland.