suburbian fishing

QUICK GUIDE TO SUBURBIAN FISHING

More than 66% of Australia’s population live within the boundaries of a capital city. That means that the majority of us deal with lots of people, lots of traffic, and busy waterways on a daily basis. With so many people and anglers accessing the rivers, lakes, estuaries, and beaches of our major cities, is there a way to beat the crowds and get the edge on suburban fishing?

You bet. Read on for tips to success in the city.

BE A PIONEER NOT A FOLLOWER

Ever noticed how some anglers gravitate towards other anglers? It’s like a magnetic force field sucks people into believing that the first angler to set up shop on a stretch of sand knew what they were doing. Don’t be a sheep and just follow the crowd.

Think logically about what you are trying to achieve and add purpose to your fishing. Have a target species in mind and tailor your efforts towards that species. Conduct some basic research and think about tides, suitable habitat and time of day to ensure that you don’t simply just turn up and hope for potluck.

THINK OUTSIDE OF THE BOX

From park ponds and industrial creeks to suburban lagoons and golf courses, fish can be caught in the most unusual places in the big smoke. Try to prioritise your fishing goals. If you’re chasing a feed, you’ll need to stick to the healthier waterways but if you’re just looking for some fun, some the more unusual creeks and ponds can provide plenty of fishing entertainment.

EXPLORE NEW FISHING GROUNDS

Despite the extensive development in our capital cities, there are still stretches of rivers, creeks, and bays that are tucked away and hard to access. Most anglers won’t bother to trek, paddle or seek out these areas, so the fishing pressure is much lower. Be the exception and hunt out these hidden gems. You’ll be surprised by what you find.

THINK ABOUT WHAT TIME TO FISH

We all know that weekends are chaotic on urban waterways. Theory suggests that Fridays and Mondays also receive additional pressure from anglers on extended weekend breaks. Tuesdays and Wednesdays provide a reprieve from fishing pressure and allow fish populations to recover. By Thursdays, the fish are at their least disturbed point on the weekly cycle. It’s worth considering this theory for the busiest waterways. Try to time any flexi-days for Thursday and focus on the dawn and dusk feeding periods.

EXPERIMENT WITH YOUR FISHING TECHNIQUES

Don’t be afraid to try something different. The best anglers are always exploring new techniques and methods to tempt fish. Experimenting will expand your knowledge on what does and doesn’t work. There will be plenty of fails, but every now and then you’ll stumble across a piece of fishing gold that will completely change the way you think and fish. It’s all part of the fishing learning curve.

FIVE SIMPLE WAYS TO GET EXPERIMENTAL

• Fish a new location
• Try a new bait or lure
• Fish an unusual tide or time
• Target a new species
• Experiment with tackle (i.e. leaders etc.)

It’s a great time to experiment when the fishing is hot. When you know the fish are biting you can get a clear indication on which lures, leaders, or baits actually work. Any tackle that fails to produce can go to the bottom of the tackle box. While successful products will instil confidence and they’ll become a viable option for future outings.

There is a direct link between the proximity of human populations and fisheries productivity. Obviously, the more anglers there are, the greater the pressure on fish populations and the harder it is to catch them. No doubt, this relationship doesn’t bode well for fishing in cities. Nevertheless, if you take the time to explore and open your mind, there is some sensational fishing to be found in the capital cities of Australia.

 


Do you regularly fish in big cities? Share any other tips or ideas with everyone in the comments section below.

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Peter Hollingsworth
peterh@dinga.com.au

Peter has been fishing all around Australia since he was a boy. He loves camping, fishing and kayak fishing.