newbie kayak angler

QUICK GUIDE TO COMMON NEWBIE KAYAK ANGLER MISTAKES

Just like fishing, kayak fishing is a process of continual learning. There are those mistakes we all make when getting started. If we are not told, these beginner mistakes can continue and ruin what could be an amazing experience and even a new lifestyle. Here are some of the most common mistakes made by newbie kayak anglers.

ONLY LOOKING AT PREDICTED TIDES

This is one of the mistakes made even before getting on the water. While checking tide charts we should also check for actual tides. Knowing this can really tell you a lot about the area you want to fish. Actual tides may be much lower due to structure and you will run out of water even for a kayak.

FISHING A SLACK TIDE

Fishing a slack tide is another common mistake made by newbie kayak anglers. A slack tide is a tide that is barely rising or falling by a few inches. Water movement triggers natural instincts to feed. If the water isn’t moving, then fish won’t feed either. This doesn’t mean that fish won’t feed at all during a slack tide but your chances of catching more fish are greatly reduced.

NOT GOING SHALLOW

One of the biggest capabilities of kayaks is the fact that you can fish really shallow water. A lot of fish are fearless in very shallow water and shallow water presents an excellent location to catch more fish. Take advantage of your kayak by fishing in shallow water.

CASTING TO EARLY

It can be hard to hold back when you see fish in the water for the first few times. It’s almost instinct to grab your rod and cast when a fish is visible. Being so low down on the water, getting a good look at the fish is something to get used to when kayak fishing. It pays to calm your nerves and cast out with finesse.

POOR LURE PLACEMENT

Poor lure placement is another one of the biggest mistakes made by newbie kayak anglers. Instead of practising to land a lure within inches of a visible fish, practise landing your lure at about 3’ from the visible fish.

SENDING OUT WARNING VIBRATIONS

Sound travels through water much more than it does through air. Noise on the deck of your kayak is like a warning siren to target fish. Granted kayak fishing is stealthy as long as you keep your noise down to a minimum and remember any noise your kayak makes is amplified in the water.

 


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Jackson Williams
jacksonw@dinga.com.au

Jackson Williams has been fishing around Australia for 20 years and loves his home region of far north Queensland.