Man Fishing River

FIVE LESSONS LEARNT FROM TARGETING TROUT IN TASMANIA

I am in the fortunate position that I have to spend several months a year in Tasmania and I have been able to spend chunks of my time fishing for Trout in the Western Lakes, Inglis River, Pet Dam, Derwent River and anywhere else I have been able to sniff out any Trout across Tasmania. I have had the chance to immerse myself in fishing lakes, dams, and bigger rivers, targeting Trout with excellent results. These are the best things I have taken away from my years of chasing Trout around Tasmania.

HEADWATER LAKES OFFER BIGGER FISH

While they may not be the most plentiful, the headwater lakes with less inflow and outflow provide an infinite source of food for the local Trout population. As a result, you can find the real trophy fish lurking in headwater lakes. Julians, the Pillans, Pine and Little Pine are all solid examples of headwater lakes with some real beasts prowling in there.

THE LURE IS KING IN AUTUMN

Trolling and spinning in autumn will give any Trout fisho their most successful period of the season. Fishing lures will deliver results in areas like Lake King William, Lake Rowallan, Dee Lagoon and Great Lake towards the end of the Brown Trout season in May.

DRY FLIES WORK WELL IN THE EVENING

When fly fishing for Trout, wait until evening and use a dry fly. Dragonflies hatch in the late afternoon, bringing in Rainbows and Browns around dusk. Find a hatch area and hit it with your dry fly to get some action.

BROWNS LOVE STRUCTURE

Look for dead trees, reefs and drop-offs. For fly fishos, shallow weeds are a blessing for Trout but if you are using soft plastics, you want the Brownies which are resident to three-dimensional structures. These Trout feed on bigger prey with more action. They don’t feed off the surface so your soft plastics will do much better around here. Look for structure in water from two to four and a half feet deep. I like to fish Arthur’s Lake on soft plastics because it has plenty of fallen trees around the shoreline.

IT IS ALL IN THE ATTENTION TO DETAIL

Tasmanian Trout are a picky bunch. They notice the slightest detail out of place and will make you pay for it. You have to present the fly or lure just right to get the attention. I have not been adverse to cutting my plastics down to size so they fit the hook perfectly, or adding head weights to make sure it gets down quick enough but isn’t too jerky on the hook.

Who would have thought that my company posting me to Tasmania would do more for my fishing than it ever did for my professional career, I certainly have no regrets and have come to love both the Tasmanian people, landscape and fishing.


 

Do you have anything to add? Do you have any tips for others targeting Trout in Tasmania? Leave them in the comments section below.

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Peter Hollingsworth
peterh@dinga.com.au

Peter has been fishing all around Australia since he was a boy. He loves camping, fishing and kayak fishing.