sleeping dog

ALLOWING DOGS TO SLEEP INDOORS

Once upon a time, dogs were outdoor creatures. They had their kennels and they protected the land from intruders. Now many of our four-legged friends sleep inside with us, sometimes sharing our bedrooms (and in some cases, our beds). They are part of the family and are treated accordingly. But what are the benefits of this? Should dogs be allowed to sleep inside? Or be relegated to the kennel in the garden?

THE BENEFITS OF MAKING YOUR DOG AN INDOOR DOG

The role of an indoor dog is totally different from their outdoor companions. They become part of the family, we share our experiences and our thoughts with them. They occupy a space between a pet and a friend. But there are also benefits for the dog.

If the dog sleeps inside with us we are more likely to spot a medical problem earlier. We will notice a change in their behaviour much more promptly and can get them treatment quickly. If you have young children, having an indoor dog around the house decreases the probability that your children will grow up having severe allergies.

THE BEST THING FOR THE DOG

It really is personal preference and depends on what role you want the dog to have in your life. Sleeping close to their owners can cause the dog to develop separation anxiety. We have all seen those dogs who flip out and whine as soon as their owner walks into a supermarket.

There is no guarantee this will develop and it certainly doesn’t happen to every dog. But it is something to bear in mind. If you let your dog sleep next to you in bed, make sure you spend some time away from it in the daytime to prevent it from developing separation anxiety.

The other side of this, is if you want your dog to sleep outside, you should make an effort to spend quality time with it in the day? Dogs are sociable animals and like to be in close proximity to their owners.

 


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Jackson Williams
jacksonw@dinga.com.au

Jackson Williams has been fishing around Australia for 20 years and loves his home region of far north Queensland.