adventure fishing

ADVENTURE ESSENTIALS WHEN YOU ARE FISHING OUT IN THE WILD

Choose the right fishing for when you are fishing gear and fishing tackle in the wild with tips from this guide.

GET YOUR KIT ON

Long pants and shirts are a sensible choice to protect your skin from the sun, but also to provide a buffer from the scrapes and scratches that are part-and-parcel of a bush-bash adventure. Wear sturdy shoes with decent grip. Wet rocks and boulders can be notoriously slippery. I vividly remember being upended by a slippery stone and falling awkwardly. I spent the rest of that day fishing with the bottom half of a broken rod.

SHIN KICKERS

Gaiters are another option to protect your shins from nasty scratches and they can also provide some insurance against a snake bite. Wear a hat, polarised sunglasses and suncream to protect your face, eyes and exposed bits. The polarised sunglasses will also help you spot fish from a distance – an important factor when stalking fish in these environments.

BANGING FISHING RODS AND FISHING REELS

Most standard fishing gear for your particular target species will suffice. However, if the bushland is particularly harsh or dense you can opt for a shorter and more robust rod. The shorter length will make clambering and casting through scrub easier, but you are likely to sacrifice some casting distance and accuracy. Another option is to choose a multiple-piece travel rod that can be disassembled for difficult sections of the journey. Lightweight rod and reel options will also make casting and hiking more enjoyable.

GETTING TO SECOND BASE

I have a preference for spin outfits in these challenging environments. I think they’re much more user-friendly, adaptable and versatile. You’re unlikely to be carrying more than one rod so it’s essential to have an outfit that can encompass as many fishing and technique scenarios as possible. From casting plastics to tossing spinnerbaits, if you need to adapt your technique you need a versatile outfit that can cope.

A clever way to cover more bases is to have two spin reels spooled with different line weights that can be interchanged onto one intermediate rod. Let’s say you’re in the tropics chasing Sooty Grunter with a reel spooled with 6lb mainline. Suddenly and unexpectedly you stumble across a waterhole full of big Barramundi. Rather than risk repeated bust-offs and frustration with your light line you can quickly dig out a reel spooled with 14lb line from your bag. It’s a quick and easy strategy and you’ll be more prepared for those unforeseen, but very welcome encounters.

 


Is there anything you can add to this article? Share your experience in the comments section below.

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Peter Hollingsworth
peterh@dinga.com.au

Peter has been fishing all around Australia since he was a boy. He loves camping, fishing and kayak fishing.